Parador de Santiago de Compostela Information

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Parador de Santiago de Compostela

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Facilities

  • Single rooms (12)
  • Twin rooms (105)
  • Double rooms (14)
  • Room with living room (6)
  • Capacity (262)
  • Conference room
  • Bar
  • Restaurant
  • Telephone
  • Central heating
  • TV
  • Canal plus
  • Satellite
  • Deposit box
  • Minibar
  • Lift
  • Garage (charged)
  • Credit cards
  • Currency exchange
  • Disabled facilities
  • Golf (10km)
  • Airport (15km)
  • Station (3km)
  • Port (70km)

Parador de Santiago de Compostela - 15th century Pilgrim's Hospice (5*)

The Parador

Considered to be the oldest hotel in the world, the Parador Santiago de Compostela was built in 1499 by order of King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella. Once a royal hospital, which provided lodging and shelter for many pilgrims who arrived in the city following the ‘Camino de Santiago’ the impressive building  along with the Romanesque cathedral  beside it and the Plaza de Obradoiro have now been named a UNESCO Heritage site and are proclaimed as historic jewels by international and national travellers alike. The Parador has kept its tradition alive to this day by giving those pilgrims staying at the hotel free meals and stamps for their passport.
The Plaza de Obradoiro is recognised as the finishing point of the ‘Camino de Santiago’ across Northern Spain and up through Portugal.
The Parador itself combines Gothic, Renaissance and Baroque elements which can be seen throughout the luxurious public areas, bedrooms and suites. The original hospital was built between 1499 and 1519 whilst the balconade and Baroque windows were added at the end of the 17th century.
The Parador has extensive conference facilities and, as may be expected, many high-level political and cultural events take place here.

Local area

The city of Santiago de Compostela boasts famous historical attributes such as the Cathedral, the ”Plaza do Obradoiro” where the Parador is located, the Gemirez and Rajoy Palaces, the Church of Santa Maria del Sar, the Monastery of San Marin Pinario, the Museum of Tapestries, the Church of Santa Maria Salome and the Museo do Pobo Galego.
Famous for traditional religious festivals such as the "Feria del Ganado" which is held during May, this fiesta offers a particular insight into the city’s Celtic roots of the Galicia region featuring a significant amount of Celtic folk music and dancing. Gastronomy is also very prominent during this particular festival with the various regional dishes of Galicia taking centre stage in the celebrations.
Another prominent festival is on the 25th July which celebrates the National Offering to the Apostle Santiago (Saint James) who was buried at the Cathedral. Furthermore, the processions during Holy Week are also very impressive.
The Autonomous Community of Galicia occupies the north-west corner of Spain and forms the border with the north of Portugal, known as the land of 1,000 rivers. Very much part of what is becoming popularly known as ‘Green Spain’, many Spaniards consider this as their favourite region of the country and regularly come here for their holidays in July and August to escape the extreme heat of the cities and countryside further south. The climate of Galicia is mild and akin to that of Britanny: maximum temperatures in the summer are around 20°C and in winter rarely fall below 5°C, with rain not at all uncommon during the winter months.

The interior of the region is largely hilly – not really mountainous – and criss-crossed by the rivers that flow down to the Cantabrian sea in the north and to the Atlantic in the west, many of them forming the famous Galician ‘Rias’, or small fjords. Stretches of the coast line have magnificent beaches and beautiful fishing villages, while in other areas the coast is wild and rocky with steep cliffs.

The principal cities in Galicia include Lugo, Ourense, Vigo and La Coruña (or A Coruña) but for most visitors the big attraction - and what an attraction - is Santiago de Compostela with its incomparable Cathedral of St James. To stand in the main square of the city (Plaza do Obradoiro) facing the Cathedral and with the magnificent Parador ‘Hostal dos Reis Catolicos’ to your left is an experience to be savoured.
The restaurants at Santiago de Compostela specialise in Galician cuisine such as Calderada dos Reis (turbot, lobster and scallops cooked in their own juices, served with greens and potatoes) Sirloin steak in a Cebreiro cheese sauce and for dessert, Filloas (crêpes filled with apple compote).

Last but not least, remember that Galicia has its own language - Gallego - which is a kind of mixture of Spanish (Castellano) and |Portuguese. Gallego is widely spoken, and used for road and other signs, throughout the region, but practically all ‘Gallegos’ also speak Castellano.

There is garage parking at this Parador.
 

Click here for Lorna Roberts' expert view of this Parador as she journeys through Galicia

Click here for Lorna Robert's expert view of this Parador as she journeys through Asturias and Cantabria

 
Santiago is now a 'Parador Museum' - click here for more details.

 

Restaurant meal times & typical dishes

Restaurant open daily from 13.00 to 16.00 and from 20.00 to 23.30.

It may be possible to arrive up to 23.00 and still enjoy a meal.

The Parador de Santiago de Compostela's restaurant offers "Calderada dos Reis" (Turbot, lobster and scallops cooked in their own juices, served with turnip greens and creamed potatoes), shellfish, free-range rooster cooked with oysters and "Filloas" (egg and flour crepes filled with a caramelized apple cream).

Visitor Comments

Wow! A fantastic place, not enough time to fully explore. Good restaurant and amazing rooms and cloisters.
Mr G Messett
My wife and I stayed at this jewel of a 5 star Parador for 1 night on the fifth leg of a 7 night self-drive “Rutas” tour organised by Keytel in the UK who specialise in Parador holidays. The only real problem we had was actually getting our car to the front door of the building! At 11am my google maps satnav app said our arrival would be in 5 minutes. After driving around Santiago in heavy traffic plus some serious road works, passing the same places up to seven times as very narrow roads which it wanted me to go down were blocked off, I finally gave the satnav up and trusted to instinct, arriving 2 hours late at 1pm if you can believe it! The problem was that the hotel, the cathedral and the town hall occupy 3 sides of the magnificent central square but the whole area is pedestrianised apart from Parador access but this last bit is not made particularly clear, which obviously confused the satnav! My recommendation to future visitors using satnavs is to put “Rua de Sanfrancisco” as your destination and remember what I said above about the exception to pedestrian only access for hotel guests. The Hostal dos Reis Catolicos with over 500 years of history is considered to be one of the world’s oldest hotels. The Catholic monarchs ordered it to be built in 1499 to provide shelter and sustenance to the pilgrims who survived the Camino de Santiago, the Way of St James. The building assumed many other functions over the years including a hospital for the poor, housing and raising foundlings (abandoned children). A huge edifice, it was a city in miniature with its own corps of priests, health workers, apothecaries, accountants and servants under the authority of a sole administrator. The square in which the impressive Parador, Santiago Cathedral, and the town hall were all positioned was indeed impressive apart from the fact that the Cathedral was almost totally covered in scaffolding as part of a renovation project which somewhat spoiled the visual effect! However parking was resolved when a valet took my keys and drove it into the garage for me (without mentioning the 19 euro charge we paid the next morning). We checked in with a friendly lady and were shown to our spacious room in one of the many areas within the complex each with their own courtyard and cloisters. The room had large twin beds with a canopy and a small side area with comfortable chairs and twin sofa. We spent the afternoon touring the Parador’s museum-like edifice, touring within the Cathedral and looking round the shops. Dinner in the evening was excellent in the basement level restaurant and the service was also very good.

How to get there

The Parador is located in Santiago's old quarter in the Plaza do Obradoiro, where some of the most outstanding monuments of the city can also be found: the cathedral, the town hall and the Colegio de San Xerome. From A Coruña you will reach Santiago along the main N-550 road, passing through Ordes, or along the A-9 motorway towards Pontevedra (65 km). Both roads take you to Noia, 34 km from Santiago, to Padrón, 22 km away and to Pontevedra, 59 km away.

Nearby Hotels

Cambados - 54km
Pontevedra - 59km
El Ferrol - 95km
Tui - 108km
Santiago Airport - 10km

Region & Cuisine

GALICIA


Occupying the north-west corner of Spain and forming the border with the north of Portugal, the Autonomous Community of Galicia is known as the land of 1,000 rivers.

Very much part of what is becoming popularly known as ‘Green Spain’, many Spaniards consider this as their favourite region of the country and regularly come here for their holidays in July and August to escape the extreme heat of the cities and countryside further south. The climate of Galicia is mild and akin to that of Britanny: maximum temperatures in the summer are around 20°C and in winter rarely fall below 5°C, with rain not at all uncommon during the winter months.

The interior of the region is largely hilly – not really mountainous – and criss-crossed by the rivers that flow down to the Cantabrian sea in the north and to the Atlantic in the west, many of them forming the famous Galician ‘Rias’, or small fjords. Stretches of the coast line have magnificent beaches and beautiful fishing villages, while in other areas the coast is wild and rocky with steep cliffs.

The principal cities in Galicia include Lugo, Ourense, Vigo and La Coruña (or A Coruña) but for most visitors the big  attraction - and  what an attraction  - is Santiago de Compostela with its incomparable Cathedral of St James. To stand in the main square of the city (Plaza do Obradoiro) facing the Cathedral and with the magnificent Parador ‘Hostal dos Reis Catolicos’ to your left is an experience to be savoured.

Also to be savoured is Galician cuisine, which enjoys a  very high reputation throughout  Spain principally for its excellent fish and seemingly endless varieties of shellfish. Whatever you enjoy that comes out of the sea, you’re virtually certain to find it in Galicia – as fresh as can be, and of the highest quality.

Apart from sea food, other Galician specialities well worth  trying are:
Caldo Gallego – very much part of Galician cuisine, this is essentially a warming soup consisting of cabbage, potatoes, beans and ham or chorizo.
Lacon con Grelos – salted ham with young turnip tops.
Cocido Gallego – meat, potatoes and chickpea stew.
Empanada Gallega – a typical pie with fish or meat. 

To accompany all this, the local Albariño white wines are extremely good,  and as a digestif (also good for a sore throat!) try ‘orujo’ which is similar to grappa.

Last but not least, remember that Galicia has its own language - Gallego - which is a kind of mixture of Spanish (Castellano) and |Portuguese.  Gallego is widely spoken, and used for road and other signs, throughout the region, but practically all ‘Gallegos’ also speak Castellano.

Please be aware of the following:

  • 'Special Offers' are subject to the availability of a number of rooms per night and/or a specific meal basis.
  • Age restrictions apply to the 'Golden Days' Offer (for those aged 55 and over) and the 'Young Persons' Offer (for those aged between 18 and 30). All reservations made using these tariffs are checked upon your arrival at the Parador(s) booked to ensure that at least one person in a room qualifies for the restricted tariff. In the case that you do not qualify for the restricted tariff, the Parador will apply the standard rate without exception and you will be required to pay a supplement locally. However only one person (per room) needs to qualify for either of these two reductions.