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Parador de Baiona

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Facilities

  • Single rooms (12)
  • Twin rooms (92)
  • Double rooms (13)
  • Room with living room (5)
  • Capacity (232)
  • Conference room
  • Bar
  • Restaurant
  • Telephone
  • Central heating
  • Air conditioning
  • TV
  • Canal plus
  • Satellite
  • Deposit box
  • Minibar
  • Gift Shop
  • Lift
  • Garage
  • Parking
  • Credit cards
  • Currency exchange
  • Garden
  • Playground
  • Tennis court
  • Gym
  • Sauna
  • Swimming pool
  • Disabled facilities
  • Football pitch (3km)
  • Golf (35km)
  • Airport (25km)
  • Station (22km)
  • Port (22km)

Parador de – Baiona (Bayona) - Galician fortress (4*)

The Parador

Magnificently located on the north west coast of Spain and close to the Portuguese border, Parador de Baiona is a traditional Galician manor house encompassed within the walls of a medieval fortress originally intended to deter pirates from this stretch of coast (Sir Francis Drake was repelled by the inhabitants of Baiona in 1585).

Flaunting Galician character from the buildings’ arquitecture through to the truly remarkable historic interior, Baiona’s Parador features timber beams and vaulting’s and a grand central staircase. A number of the bedrooms have splendid sea views which we highly recommend and are available at a supplement. The lush green gardens and outside swimming pool enable guests to relax and enjoy the peaceful surroundings of this idyllic Parador.

Keytel Tips

- Fantastic views of the sea and 1km of walls to walk round.
- Consider upgrading to a larger room with views.
- Continental breakfast can be ordered with room service in the bedroom free of charge.

Local Area

Baiona is a beautiful coastal town close to the city of Vigo in Galicia, Northern Spain. Protected by the open sea, it is historically known for its fishing trade. Although it is still a popular spot with sailors and many yachts use the marina, in more recent years Baiona has become an attraction for visitors wanting to explore its medieval quarter (declared a Historical and Artistic site by the Galician council in 1933), to enjoy the 4 kilometres of sandy beaches or to indulge in the very diverse Galician gastronomy.

Galician culture is very prominent in Baiona; they host a range of fiestas such as their very own Fiesta de la Arribada celebrated during the first week of March, it commemorates the arrival of the Pinta ship, the fastest returning ship of Christopher Columbus’ fleet during the discovery of America.
Much like the rest of Spain, if visiting Baiona during Easter week you will experience the traditional setting of beautifully created floral carpets with religious symbols, life size pilgrimages of the Virgin of the Rocks and various processions which unite the residents.

There is garage parking at this Parador.

 

Click here for Lorna Roberts' expert view of this Parador as she journeys through Galicia

 

Restaurant meal times & typical dishes

Breakfast is served from 7.30 to 11.00 and dinner from 20.030 to 23.00.

It may be possible to arrive up to 22.30 and still enjoy a meal.

In the dining room: Cooked sellfish, "Rodaballo salvaje a la parrilla" (grilled coastal turbot), "Tarta de Santiago" (Almond and egg cake) and "Filloas" (This crepes made from egg and flour, filled with confectioner's cream).

Visitor Comments

A beautiful place in a lovely setting. Absolute treasure, palatial interior, 1km of walls to walk round. Fantastic views of the sea, brilliant.

How to get there

The Parador is located in the Monte Real enclosure, isolated from the town and protected by the sea. Baiona is 25 km from Vigo and 50 km from Pontevedra.

Nearby Hotels

Tui - 25km
Pontevedra - 50km
Cambodas - 78km
Santiago de Compostela - 125km
Santiago Airport - 125km

Region & Cuisine

GALICIA


Occupying the north-west corner of Spain and forming the border with the north of Portugal, the Autonomous Community of Galicia is known as the land of 1,000 rivers.

Very much part of what is becoming popularly known as ‘Green Spain’, many Spaniards consider this as their favourite region of the country and regularly come here for their holidays in July and August to escape the extreme heat of the cities and countryside further south. The climate of Galicia is mild and akin to that of Britanny: maximum temperatures in the summer are around 20°C and in winter rarely fall below 5°C, with rain not at all uncommon during the winter months.

The interior of the region is largely hilly – not really mountainous – and criss-crossed by the rivers that flow down to the Cantabrian sea in the north and to the Atlantic in the west, many of them forming the famous Galician ‘Rias’, or small fjords. Stretches of the coast line have magnificent beaches and beautiful fishing villages, while in other areas the coast is wild and rocky with steep cliffs.

The principal cities in Galicia include Lugo, Ourense, Vigo and La Coruña (or A Coruña) but for most visitors the big  attraction - and  what an attraction  - is Santiago de Compostela with its incomparable Cathedral of St James. To stand in the main square of the city (Plaza do Obradoiro) facing the Cathedral and with the magnificent Parador ‘Hostal dos Reis Catolicos’ to your left is an experience to be savoured.

Also to be savoured is Galician cuisine, which enjoys a  very high reputation throughout  Spain principally for its excellent fish and seemingly endless varieties of shellfish. Whatever you enjoy that comes out of the sea, you’re virtually certain to find it in Galicia – as fresh as can be, and of the highest quality.

Apart from sea food, other Galician specialities well worth  trying are:
Caldo Gallego – very much part of Galician cuisine, this is essentially a warming soup consisting of cabbage, potatoes, beans and ham or chorizo.
Lacon con Grelos – salted ham with young turnip tops.
Cocido Gallego – meat, potatoes and chickpea stew.
Empanada Gallega – a typical pie with fish or meat. 

To accompany all this, the local Albariño white wines are extremely good,  and as a digestif (also good for a sore throat!) try ‘orujo’ which is similar to grappa.

Last but not least, remember that Galicia has its own language - Gallego - which is a kind of mixture of Spanish (Castellano) and |Portuguese.  Gallego is widely spoken, and used for road and other signs, throughout the region, but practically all ‘Gallegos’ also speak Castellano.

Please also check our full range of Special Offers, phone us on 020 7953 3020 or request a reservation online.

Please be aware of the following:

  • The prices shown are for the total cost of accommodation including IVA (Tax)
  • Please note that 'Special Offers' are subject to the availability of a number of rooms per night and/or a specific meal basis.
  • Age restrictions apply to the 'Golden Days' Offer (for those aged 55 and over) and the 'Young Persons' Offer (for those aged between 18 and 30). All reservations made using these tariffs are checked upon your arrival at the Parador(s) booked to ensure that at least one person in a room qualifies for the restricted tariff. In the case that you do not qualify for the restricted tariff, the Parador will apply the standard rate without exception and you will be required to pay a supplement locally. However only one person (per room) needs to qualify for either of these two reductions.